Setting in bessie head maru

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Setting in bessie head maru

My second read solidified my perception that Maru is a type of warped fairy tale, one especially with no happily ever after. Although the prince-like Maru marries the despised and hated woman of the town of Dilepe, Margaret is no Cinderella, especially since she loves someone else and considers Maru her equal, not her superior.

The two of them have become outcasts in their small African society, and we know from the first pages that both suffer from their fates.

Setting in bessie head maru

Maru is the son of a chieftain, destined to become the next village chief, and is able to wield the power of his opinion in the town. When the orphaned Masawra woman Margaret enters the town, proud of her upbringing and training from a white missionary, Maru immediately sees his opportunity to teach the community the wrongness of prejudice.

His hope is that the rest of the town will learn from him: The Masawra, or bushmen, were the lowest class of people, literally listed next to the zebras as inhabitants of the bush. Africans in Southern Africa could still smile—at least, they were not Bushmen.

Margaret is proud to be a Masawra and declines to hide behind a different label. Maru is likewise complicated, but I despised him, so I have a hard time believing his motives to be pure. He pursues and marries Margaret supposedly because he wanted to give the rest of the world a message, that prejudice is ridiculous, that Masawra are people too.

Every new and unacceptable idea had to be put abruptly into practice, making no allowance for prejudice. A day had come when he had decided that he did not need any kingship other than the kind of wife everybody would loathe from the bottom of their hearts.

They no longer care for him. Did Maru really love Margaret? This question seems to be the crux of the novel. In fact, I think Ms Head attempts to redeem Maru. I still dislike him. Another important aspect of the novel, then, is the question of love.

What is sincere love? I have not even mentioned Moleka, the local man who had a reputation for sleeping around but who finally finds a magical, non-lustful love in the woman Margaret.

Setting in bessie head maru

This novel is a novel because of his presence. To me, it seemed that Moleka is the one who truly loves Margaret, and whom she too loves.

Maru, on the other hand, attempts to influence society by his actions; he tricks Moleka and Margaret so that he gets the girl he wants in the end, so he can be the high moral individual who ignores prejudice.

He seems to act not out of love but out of desire for his place in society, ironically being cast out from society even as he makes that choice.

The end which is the beginning, since we know how it will end from page oneseems like a failed fairy tale. But the community still rejected them.

This is a more realistic fairy tale, though. In what society is the Cinderella completely accepted? Of course, the fairy tale analogy fails in many ways. Ms Head was not trying to write a realistic fairy tale; she was simply trying to show the complications of modern prejudice in an insular Botswana or South African community.

Maru, who tries to overcome prejudice, still comes across as prejudiced, since he noticed Margaret simply because she was a Masawra.

In the end, my favorite character in the novel was Dikeledi. She still had to learn to control her prejudice. Although she loved Margaret and was a true friend, even she sometimes found herself considering the difference between Margaret as a Masawra and the rest of the community.

The prejudice was so deeply ingrained in her upbringing that she too had to overcome her prejudice. She was the one who said a line that seemed to be ironic in its import to the novel. The author Bessie Head must have wanted this to be true in the fictional village of Dilepe:Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Maru at plombier-nemours.com Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users.

No one can be dissatisfied with Bessie Head’s strives for social justice and her attempts to annihilate racism, but this book is even beyond that. She handles this situation with grace, and finds.

"Setting In Bessie Head Maru" Essays and Research Papers Setting In Bessie Head Maru Bessie by Chris Albertson Rowdy, powerful, and innovative songstress, Bessie Smith dominated the s blues circuit in America. Maru Summary and Study Guide SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature.

This page guide for “Maru” by Bessie Head includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis. Maru is a story about the reaches of oppression within the village of Dilepe in Botswana. It is a fascinating story which examines how oppression and prejudice are .

I will compare Bessie Head’s Maru with Ben Okri’s Starbook to show how the oral tradition in the latter text makes it achieve a level of magic realism that cannot be possible in Head’s Maru. Keywords: Magic Realism, Oral Literature, Fantasy, Setting, Dream World 1.

Maru Summary and Study Guide SuperSummary, a modern alternative to SparkNotes and CliffsNotes, offers high-quality study guides for challenging works of literature. This page guide for “Maru” by Bessie Head includes detailed chapter summaries and analysis, as well as several more in-depth sections of expert-written literary analysis.

What are the main themes developed in Maru? | eNotes